Recently Published AVGN Scholarly Paper

James / February 27th, 2012

Here’s an essay by a graduate film student about Cinemassacre (Mainly AVGN and the relationship with fans online). It was published in “Mediascape: UCLA’s Journal of Cinema and Media Studies.”
Check it out.

 

Comments

  • February 27, 2012 at 4:53 pm

    Too much to read so late at night, downloaded to have a proper read another time.

  • RhyanChapman

    February 27, 2012 at 5:26 pm

    thats awesome!

  • nowhere4321

    February 27, 2012 at 7:28 pm

    I’m kind of surprised that James has so many young fans.  I’m 38 and I’m just the right age to actually have played all the different systems the AVGN plays.  I’m sure a lot of young people are just watching because it’s a funny show, but it’s nice to see that a lot of them appreciate the older games (even the bad ones).

    • firewarrior2112

      February 27, 2012 at 7:54 pm

       @nowhere4321 i first watched avgn when i was 13(it was badass with all the swearing) but i found a love for retro gaming i never would have had if james had never decided to make his movies, as the first console i had was a gamecube. im 18 now and i own an atari 2600 and a mega drive and im always looking for new consoles and games in garage sales and stuff. and oh yes, i have E.T. –_–. its so bad…

    • TorpeErik

      February 28, 2012 at 2:32 pm

       @nowhere4321 Yeah, i`m 37 and for me the period of gaming James covers are “the golden age of gaming” , where the graphics forced you to use your imagination..But perhaps it`s just the golden age of youth! But yeah, all the kids surprises me to.

  • WilliamMunnyOutlaw

    February 27, 2012 at 9:12 pm

    Im proud to say that i am one of the nerds many teenage fans. It is a true testament to his work that he has ensnared us with this fascinating era I knew so little about. For me, the Nerds videos are not just entertainment, but history lessons as well

  • itscmillertime

    February 27, 2012 at 9:46 pm

    I write for a living and that was too many big words for me.

  • LicaWolf

    February 27, 2012 at 10:10 pm

    Very interesting read, thank you so much for sharing this. I would have liked that it included more about the movie and the Indigogo campaign, though. The economic support the fans had given to the movie is definately a testament of the power of web 2.0, and the benefits of cultivating a closer relationship with a fandom.
     
    And according to this study, I’m part of a minority, I’m female and I’m a fierce fan of AVGN and videogames :)

  • Doogrisa

    February 28, 2012 at 2:22 am

    i bet old consoles and games are selling like hot cakes on ebay because of James.

    • TheGeekyPenguin

      February 28, 2012 at 5:36 pm

       @Doogrisa I actually purchased a wii for virtual console games mainly due to the love I formed for them thanks to James, I know I could have bought the old consoles but im on a physical space issue :)

      • Doogrisa

        February 28, 2012 at 6:02 pm

        @TheGeekyPenguin cool

  • BrandeX

    February 28, 2012 at 6:12 am

    The author highlights an important issue in regards to Cinemassacre.com. It is nearly impossible to have a contiguous conversation, or leave comments regarding the site or other projects in general, when they are quickly buried under various comments on the latest content posting. You guys should really think about installing a forum on the website for fans to have discussions on.

  • February 28, 2012 at 8:02 am

    His attempt to reach the fans was a bit limited I think, but otherwise it’s a good article.  Seems like it was written before the indiegogo campaign happened, I bet he was kicking himself afterward because that would have given him plenty to write about.

  • TobiasMathes

    February 28, 2012 at 9:27 am

    the current movie donations would have served him as a major point. poor guy!
    i´d been interessted to read a little more about fan demographics! especially about age frequencies. with an age of 27 I always considered myself to be one of the oldtimers around here ^^
    it had also been interessting to read about the various countries your fans/audience lives in. since im from outside the US and judging from a couple of comments i´ve in mind right now, there are a LOT of different countries!
    and one last thing: a shame i did not had the chance to participate in the survey. didn´t see anything of this here on the site back then… :(

    • tluassa

      February 28, 2012 at 9:54 am

       @TobiasMathes 
       
      Im turning 28 next month,  so your not alone :)  
      Still I think the site in general touches a lot of topics that one can really relate too at our age,  so I dont think were alone here.     At least we oldies saw /owned some of the stuff  (Super Mario, Nintendo, Atari etc)  as it happened in the late 80′s / early 90′s    :) 
       
      ps.  im from Germany so also one of the outside US Fans.  But thats what the Internet is all about isnt it ?   And almost all of the stuff discussed here was also sold / appeared in  Europe  :)

      • TobiasMathes

        February 28, 2012 at 10:12 am

         @tluassa
        /sign!
         
        (I´m german as well :P Actually, I noticed a lot of Germans around here, but that might as well be selective perception ;) Weird though, but nice to see :))
         

      • BenSager

        February 28, 2012 at 11:20 am

         @TobiasMathes  @tluassa
         Hey guys i´m german too and guess what?! I´m now in my 30th. :)

    • Doogrisa

      February 28, 2012 at 5:35 pm

      @TobiasMathes 34 here

    • NeleAbels

      February 29, 2012 at 10:23 am

       @TobiasMathes You are not. I am 44.

    • Cyberxion

      February 29, 2012 at 11:15 am

       @TobiasMathes You’re just a baby. I’ll be 33 in a few months. :P

      • TobiasMathes

        March 1, 2012 at 5:34 pm

        Seems like I´ve got excellent company :)
        I see a lot of old farts around ^^ I like it :)

  • ABOhiccups

    February 28, 2012 at 4:19 pm

    I made a Rom Hack of Mega Man 2 based of Angry Video Game Nerd we all know. Is called AVGN VS Dr. Wily.
     
    Follow the links to play it.
     
    AVGN VS Dr. Wily (Download Rom)
    http://www.romhacking.net/hacks/851/
     
    AVGN VS Dr. Wily (Play it on Browser)
    http://www.vizzed.com/play/mega-man-avgn-vs-dr-wily–online–36208-game

    • AlphonseElric

      February 29, 2012 at 1:02 am

       @ABOhiccups daaaamn that’s a goddamn hard game, but meh, I beat it

  • JimFleury

    February 28, 2012 at 5:36 pm

    I really wish I could’ve written about the Indiegogo campaign! I had written it right before James started taking donations for the movie. I’m thinking of writing another paper after the AVGN movie is released though – might send out another survey for that sometime. And it was incredible to see how diverse the fans are.

    • Bazuuka

      February 28, 2012 at 5:58 pm

       @JimFleury Excellent paper dude! really thorough! :D

    • Aikou

      February 29, 2012 at 12:48 pm

       @JimFleury That was a really good, well-written article.

    • TobiasMathes

      March 1, 2012 at 5:37 pm

       @JimFleury please talk with james about posting the new survey on his blog then. else the majority of fans wont see it, I´d say!

  • Kaleidoscopic God

    February 28, 2012 at 11:26 pm

    Too intellectual for me.

  • Huloo

    February 29, 2012 at 4:21 pm

    I bet i could read that .. but atm moment it’ll take too much effort .. but to be able to write a scholarly paper using the Nerd as an example for an argument, it just shows how much of an impact the Nerd has had :)
     

  • theretrogamer14

    February 29, 2012 at 4:51 pm

    LOVED IT! I felt as though you are finally in a possible position of becoming a cult sensation (maybe even on TV) like MST3k which would be awesome (not that you aren’t big now, just not TV wise or anything like that) still keep up the good work hope to see more like this about you!

  • noctique

    February 29, 2012 at 6:02 pm

    It was a well informed article, but I feel just, something is missing, I dont know what. I havent done too much research about James Rolfe as a person and all, but I already knew everything in the article. Mike Matei was only mentioned, in my opinion he deserve some more words, it was much writing about Cinemassacre production. Anyway, James Role like blew my mind with the AVGN videoes, and i fell in love with his character instantly. Its so honest and i sense the innocent(dont take this the negative way) like this is a good guy, and i really whish the best for him. If James Rolfe appeared to be funny in the videos, and an really asshole in person, wouldnt that change our look on what his making? And I am grateful for his effortness to entertain us fans.
     
    You know, even though his carrer was kind of a cioncidence that took its own life, it was well deserved because his talent wasnt a cioncidence and a lucky hit, no, he continued to evolve and importantly with his fans (yea I know that was mentioned in the article). James Rolfe is a GENIOUS! He created a new character, a new show, and now a real proffesional movie!! For me this is kind of and epic story right there!My point is, I wasent left with that feeling reading this article, but creds to the guy anyway he wrote alot and did a good job. Maybe im too personal im sure, but i think thats great about cinemassacre and why we love it – its so down too earth and everyone can emphatize with their topic and so and so, im gonna stop right here before this turning in to an article too…:-)

  • noctique

    February 29, 2012 at 6:06 pm

    It was a well informed article, but I feel just, something is missing, I dont know what. I havent done too much research about James Rolfe as a person and all, but I already knew everything in the article. Mike Matei was only mentioned, in my opinion he deserve some more words, it was much writing about Cinemassacre production. Anyway, James Role like blew my mind with the AVGN videoes, and i fell in love with his character instantly. Its so honest and i sense the innocent(dont take this the negative way) like this is a good guy, and i really whish the best for him. If James Rolfe appeared to be funny in the videos, and an really asshole in person, wouldnt that change our look on what his making? And I am grateful for his effortness to entertain us fans.
     
    You know, even though his carrer was kind of a cioncidence that took its own life, it was well deserved because his talent wasnt a cioncidence and a lucky hit, no, he continued to evolve and importantly with his fans (yea I know that was mentioned in the article). James Rolfe is a GENIOUS! He created a new character, a new show, and now a real proffesional movie!! For me this is kind of and epic story right there!My point is, I wasent left with that feeling reading this article, but creds to the guy anyway he wrote alot and did a good job. Maybe im too personal im sure, but i think thats great about cinemassacre and why we love it – its so down too earth and everyone can emphatize with their topic and so and so, im gonna stop right here before this turning in to an article too…:-)

  • ZombieKillerXXX

    February 29, 2012 at 6:55 pm

    Great paper Jim, I’ll be looking forward to another one in the future. Hopefully this time I will get to participate in the survey, if you choose to create another one. Keep up the good work, an I really enjoyed reading your paper.
     
     P.S. Sorry that you ran into some problems with people not wanting to be cooperative at first with your survey and what not. Everyone here for the most part, (99.9%) want nothing but good things for James. Someone coming in from the “outside” with that type of survey, may see the people in this community being a little stand offish. With that said it’s like were all James big brother in a sense, because you will seeing people on here get defensive if James is not spoken about in the right context. Which is completely understandable because we all want the best for James, see him succeed with any project he is working on, and hopefully we will get to enjoy him and everything revolving around Cinemassacre for years to come.
     
    Great Paper!!!

  • ZombieKillerXXX

    February 29, 2012 at 6:58 pm

    Great paper Jim, I’ll be looking forward to another one in the future. Hopefully this time I will get to participate in the survey, if you choose to create another one. Keep up the good work, an I really enjoyed reading your paper.
     
     P.S. Sorry that you ran into some problems with people not wanting to be cooperative at first with your survey and what not. Everyone here for the most part, (99.9%) want nothing but good things for James. Someone coming in from the “outside” with that type of survey, may see the people in this community being a little stand offish. With that said it’s like were all James big brother in a sense, because you will see people on here get defensive if James is not spoken about in the right context. Which is completely understandable because we all want the best for James, see him succeed with any project he is working on, and hopefully we will get to enjoy him and everything revolving around Cinemassacre for years to come.
     
    Great Paper!!!

    • Oglaf

      March 1, 2012 at 9:15 am

      @ZombieKillerXXX

    • Oglaf

      March 1, 2012 at 9:15 am

      @ZombieKillerXXX

      Well said! I agree whole-heartedly.

    • TobiasMathes

      March 1, 2012 at 5:33 pm

       @ZombieKillerXXX there are always a lot of uncooperative (to frame it nicely) people who act like you would threaten their lives if you´r posting any kind of scientific survey in their beloved forums or somewhere else. sadly I experienced this as well, but on a completely different topic. but thats the people out there… what can you do about it?! actually, a lot of people require a bit of openness; not only about science, I think.

    • JimFleury

      March 1, 2012 at 6:34 pm

       @ZombieKillerXXX Thanks for the compliments, and I’ll be sure to post any new survey on here. It’s interesting how some fans (of anything) react negatively – especially since I had been a Cinemassacre fan for a couple years before I sent out the survey (I just had never posted before) – but you’re definitely right that some fans don’t like it when someone from the “outside” tries to study their community.

      • TobiasMathes

        March 2, 2012 at 3:00 pm

         @JimFleury  thats not with fans only! its the behaviour of people in general! i´ve done some studies myself, all without fans (instead normal people), but especially on the internet you get the worst responses possible. if you ask people to apply in an experiment offline / face-to-face, the response is a lot nicer and many more are willing to participate!
        I experienced this fist hand. the same study online and offline. online: 50 participants and some bad responses. offline: around 1000 participants and only very nice responses.
        says a lot about ‘the online people’. or people, that are hiding behind their flat-screens.
        I think on the internet people are more anxious if other people come and want something from them. especially if they want to get some data from you or want to study you… on the one hand absolutly understandable, on the other hand this is serious scientific research you dont have to worry about. especially if you provide an university-contact adress they could go/write/call. but who wants to take this effort?! bad luck for us scientists…

      • ZombieKillerXXX

        March 2, 2012 at 8:05 pm

         @TobiasMathes  @JimFleury People online will in a sense hide behind there screen name or avatar. They get a feeling of empowerment when they are not face to face with someone, and will generally say things they never would  because there not face to face with whom ever there responding to. There basically cowards, they feel safe saying what they want because there is no repercussions. That is something that will never change as long as the internet is so impersonal, and people are going to continue to keep saying what ever they want because they feel safe in doing so. I feel you, as far as dealing with people face to face, it’s usually a much more enjoyable experience. Not to say I haven’t meet nice people on the internet because I have, there is just a few out there that ruin it for everyone else, that is just my opinion.

  • TheProfessor

    March 1, 2012 at 9:38 am

    I thought the paper was great. Very well written and from a unique point of view. I do have one question (to anyone out there who knows); the paper says that James changed the character’s name from “Nintendo” to “Video Game” so that he could expand to include games that were not on the NES, but I could swear that I’ve heard James himself say he did this to avoid possible copyright problems with Nintendo.
     
    Anyone?
     
    On a personal note, I loved that the paper pointed out that James actually likes “Simon’s Quest”. I’ve run into a lot of young fans who hate on games like Ninja Turtles or Ninja Gaiden (without having ever played them) just because AVGN did a video about it and it drives me nuts.

    • JimFleury

      March 1, 2012 at 6:29 pm

       @TheProfessor You’re right about James changing the title to also avoid copyright issues with Nintendo (which probably would’ve been a problem once the merchandise started). I can’t remember where he said that, but I mention it as a footnote in the article.  And thanks for your compliments on the article!

      • TheProfessor

        March 2, 2012 at 1:25 pm

         @JimFleury
         I just gotta say one more thing about your paper:”This commodification of retro gaming appeals to players’ nostalgia, a  feeling, according to Laurie N. Taylor and Zach Whalen, “best understood as a  process of looking back to an unattainable past and trying to bring that past  into the present.””
         
        You (and the referenced authors) really hit the nail on the head there. Most of my friends don’t get why I like the AVGN so much, especially when I tell them, “It’s like I grew up with the guy. He is able to put into words (video) so well exactly what I felt as a kid, but was unable to express at the time”. Compound this with the fact that I’m an American living in Brazil and that there was little to no gaming culture in the 80s, therefore I have very few friends (here) to relate to on this matter. James (and the community he helped build) really give me an “outlet” to share my common interests. For that, I will always be grateful, as sometimes, the feeling of cultural isolation living as an ex-pat can be overwhelming.

  • TheProfessor

    March 1, 2012 at 9:50 am

    P.S. – This is just my opinion, but I did think it was a mistake to mention the Irate Gamer in the same category as The Nostalgia Critic/HVGN and include him as a spin off. It seems to give him some undue validation. I’m trying not to sound biased, but there is a fine line between spin off and rip off. While the aforementioned two used the Nerd’s “nostalgic momentum” to build thier own shows/fanbase, the latter is more of a bottom shelf carbon copy who used the actual Nerd to create his fanbase. Again, just my opinion.

    • Kaleidoscopic God

      March 1, 2012 at 10:46 am

       @TheProfessor I agree. Irate Gamer deserves no kind of respect. I’m also with you on the fans who hate on games because the Nerd (as a character) does.

    • Sigmoid

      March 1, 2012 at 12:24 pm

       @TheProfessor Well the Irate Gamer seems to have found his voice with this history of games series, that really is cool and somewhat more detailed and scholarly than the AVGN take on history.
      But yea, he’s the Transmorphers of nostalgic game reviewing.

      • TheProfessor

        March 1, 2012 at 11:29 pm

         @Sigmoid
         I feel it would be sacriligious to talk about IG on here, but I agree that he has found his “voice”. He has definitely branched off and started doing his own thing a little more. Unfortunately, for him, I think he is just a poor content maker overall. Even his other series like “History of Video Games” are so full of factual inaccuracies and mistakes that I almost feel sorry for the guy. Almost. I think his fan base is made up 2 types of people:
         
        1) Those who don’t know any better.
        2) Those who like to watch him fuck up.

    • ZombieKillerXXX

      March 1, 2012 at 8:52 pm

       @TheProfessor Well said, the Irate Gamer should definitely not be spoken in the same breath as James. He’s a total rip off, and to make things worse he is not even funny.

      • TobiasMathes

        March 3, 2012 at 3:08 am

         @ZombieKillerXXX  @TheProfessor because of you, I tried to watch two or three of his clips as openminded as possible.
        it´s unbelievable boring, 99% of the time not funny at all and the guy himself is just not nice to watch or listen to. and I couldn´t shake the feeling that he is trying hard to copy james but failing in a big way.
        I could not even watch some of them till the end. that says a lot, I think.

      • ZombieKillerXXX

        March 3, 2012 at 11:10 pm

         @TobiasMathes  @TheProfessor First off I just want to apologize for getting the idea in your head to watch the Irate Gamer. I feel sorry for anyone who wastes there time watching that crap. I’m glad to hear that I’m not the only one who couldn’t make it all the way through one of his horrible episodes. Check out the Happy Video Game Nerd sometime, he at least acknowledges that his show is completely influenced by James and his AVGN series. Plus there not too bad….there at least more watchable than those shitty Irate Gamer episodes.

      • Eman1

        March 7, 2012 at 3:53 am

         @ZombieKillerXXX 
         
        Thanks for the recommendation on hvgn… just watched splatterhouse review so awsome.

  • nate64

    March 2, 2012 at 6:51 pm

    Damn good paper! that one comment by the user “Samdrm” summed it up for me about the fans. Very spot-on, I thought the same about Mike as The Joker too. I said a looong time ago in a comment that I wanted to drink a beer with you guy’s and Kyle, The feelings still there. GL with all your endeavours nerd and company.

    • TobiasMathes

      March 3, 2012 at 3:11 am

       @nate64 yeah, that´d be great. or just playing some (video-) games or watching movies. lots of fun I imagine.
      unfortunatly none of my friends play videogames anymore, but one :(

  • Olivania

    March 3, 2012 at 3:08 pm

    Why did they post this again?

  • My1stday

    March 6, 2012 at 5:38 am

    Jesus fucking crist! whatafak is wrong whit that faking Mobile ad comercial, everywhere I clig i get redirected to that page, i realize you need money guys, but god dam, leave some kind of directory wich i could press to move forward to segment i was going to, not just leave me on that faking page whit mobile add, wtf sould I do ? just stare at that ? is juat faking to much for me. I have to go back to faking main page, then look again for the segment i was looking before, for god sake !

  • My1stday

    March 6, 2012 at 5:41 am

    Jesus fucking crist! whatafak is wrong whit that faking Mobile ad comercial, everywhere I clig i get redirected to that page, i realize you need money guys, but god dam, leave some kind of directory wich i could press to move forward to segment i was going to, not just leave me on that faking page whit mobile add, wtf sould I do ? just stare at that ? is juat faking to much for me. I have to go back to faking main page, then look again for the segment i was looking before, for god sake !

  • March 8, 2012 at 10:17 am

    Whussup, Essay?!!

  • Ellpoyohlokoh

    March 14, 2012 at 5:09 pm

    At one point in the paper he spells James’ last name “Rolph.”  I believe that this man has lost ALL his credibility.

    • Kaleidoscopic God

      March 14, 2012 at 5:49 pm

      @Ellpoyohlokoh Oh, please. Everyone has brainfarts.

    • JimFleury

      March 14, 2012 at 9:55 pm

       @Ellpoyohlokoh I can’t believe that typo slipped through – thanks for catching it. I had proofread the paper more than a few times and it had gone through two peer revisions before it was submitted to the journal’s web editor. Funny how long a typo goes unnoticed, but that’s the same with any publishing (journals, websites, newspapers, magazines, books, etc.).

  • SpearedPage

    March 17, 2012 at 9:51 am

     @JimFleury, I enjoyed your paper – a smooth, informative read. With regards to your thoughts on the appeal of “retro” culture in the AVGN videos, I would argue that – in addition to what you mention about the “deep, emotional” potential that revisitations of the past can have for the gaming community – another, arguably more fundamental role of the AVGN’s focus on old games from obsolete platforms is that of eliciting comic effects.
     
    I don’t think the reviews would be nearly as funny (or at least not funny in the same way) if they were about newly released games. As James has frequently pointed out (and your paper acknowledges), the purpose of his videos is not actually to express fair and balanced criticism – something video game fans and consumers might have a right to expect, I think, from reviews of new games on the market. Part of what makes the AVGN videos so successful is that the Nerd’s vitriol is unleashed against an antiquated collection of odd, worn-out, and for the most part obscure games, whose potential claims to greatness have long since expired. If James’s rage was genuine and targeted at new games, I think the humour of the AVGN videos would have a more difficult time transpiring through the harshness of the tirades. (In the same way, the Epic Meal Time videos perhaps could not be taken so lightly if the individuals gorging themselves in front of the camera were not somewhat fit, young specimens of masculinity rather than, say, a group of morbidly obese people. As with the AVGN videos, audiences are aware that the objectionable behaviour being shown is at least to some extent part of an act.)
     
    Of course, I recognize that many of the Nerd’s critical reactions are – however obscenely exaggerated – often rooted in truth. This too is part of the humour. Given the videogame industry’s “breakneck leapfrogging,” that is, its increasingly rapid cycles of evolution, the exploration of games from generations past affords reviewers like James opportunities to expose and make fun of the preposterously out-of-date conventions such games often rely on. Many of the Nerd’s oath-ridden lamentations arise from differences in the ways games were made in days of old; for example, their overly complex password systems, the lack of save points, the pointlessness of high scores, obscurely hidden codes, and most commonly, egregious difficulty levels.
     
    As I’m trying to show, however, it’s not just the outdatedness of game conventions that provoke comedy in the AVGN series, but the primitiveness of the games themselves. Just the appearance of a game cartridge – bland, inert, almost clumsly-looking – has something almost embarrassingly comical about it. And yet there was a period in history when this technology had the pretention of being state-of-the-art. As anyone who owned a Super Nintendo Entertainment System or Sega Genesis can attest to, they were once awe-inspiring objects of reverence. (Admit it, who in their youth didn’t have that friend who perhaps might not have been quite so dear an acquaintance – don’t lie to yourself, opportunist! – if it weren’t for his glorious 16-bit game console?)
     
    The early periods of video game history were a time when game genres were still very much fluid and subject to various kinds of experimentation – not always with positive results. Graphics, of course, were not as advanced nor were audio capabilities as perfected as in the current generation of consoles. Successful games depended on the developers’ abilities to produce unique visual styles, immersive universes, and engaging forms of gameplay without the use of realistic graphics and sound. Successful games, however, are not the highlight of the AVGN series. The games James reviews are not only obsolete, but typically poorly conceived, even by their own contemporary standards. A lot of the pleasure I derive from watching the AVGN videos stems from discovering along with the Nerd the various sources of frustration and boredom in a game, its glitches and errors, and the many possible flaws relating to gameplay, stage design, and controls. Viewers laugh at the primitiveness and misconceived nature of these games as they might laugh at similar limitations in medical theories from Antiquity and the Middle Ages, for example. (Ancient Greeks and their medieval followers used lettuce, for instance, to treat venereal disease. This notion is amusing to me – but it had the status of wisdom when it was hatched up many centuries ago.)
     
    I agree that the appeal of retro games in the AVGN series involves viewer identification and the exploitation of nostalgia, as you underscore in your paper; but I also think that retro games provide the videos with much of their comedic potential. As James himself has stressed, a lot of very bad games were being made for systems like the Atari and NES. The foreignness of old games can surprise viewers into laughter, and their more primitive aspects are what induce many of the Nerd’s humorous, over-the-top reactions. The way the Nerd character takes the games he reviews so seriously is absurd and evocative of futility precisely because these games are just dusty relics of the past, which were never meant to meet today’s gaming standards. This kind of humour in the AVGN videos is perhaps indebted to the long tradition of comedic portrayals in which people are constantly getting worked up and being put through all kinds of emotional states as a reaction to the obstinacy of the material world. (Think, for example, of Charlie Chaplin in Modern Times!)
     
    Let me just close here by saying thanks to James for all the gut-busting and surprisingly thought-provoking videos! And congratulations to you Jim on the publication of your paper! (Apologies in advance for the long-windedness of this comment as well as for any typos it may contain.)

  • March 18, 2012 at 1:01 am

    Thats Astounding. Great work

  • March 18, 2012 at 1:03 am

    Thats fantastic work.

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