Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (1984)

Mike Matei / April 21st, 2009

Trek Trilogy – Star Trek 3

Comments

  • April 10, 2010 at 8:36 pm

    It’s worth mentioning that Christopher Lloyd played a much scarier villain as Judge Doom in Robert Zemeckis’ Who Framed Roger Rabbit! Without giving away who his character was, all I can say is that his character is so vil and evil, you wouldn’t look at Doc Brown the same way again!

  • July 8, 2010 at 10:19 pm

    I grew up with this trek movie on repeat. It’s OK. Whatever, I guess. Good memorabilia.

  • Shindaria

    July 11, 2010 at 2:04 am

    I our Star Trek club there was a rumor going around that might answer the question “Why kill Spock only to bring him back the next movie?”

    “The Wrath of Khan” was written by Harvey Bennett, and there was a rumor, that by there Leonard Nimoy was getting tiered of his fame. His book “I’m not Spock” came out a few years before. So it was Nimoy’s request . But the outrage of the public was so great, that Paramount begged Nimoy to come back. He agreed to play Spock, at the condition that he will direct the movie.

    So goes the rumor…

  • Sugarbaby

    August 8, 2010 at 8:04 pm

    Long time lurker, first time commenter! I just had to comment on two things for this review:

    1) You ask about the futility of killing off Spock in ST2, only to bring him back in ST3?? Talk to Leonard Nimoy. It’s a widely known fact (and I’m honestly surprised that you’re not aware of this, James, considering your geeky movie pedigree!!) that by this point of the ST franchise, Nimoy was getting tired of Spock and was working on personal projects of his own. He hoped that by killing off his best-known character he could finally break the shackles of being typecast and be able to try new things. Unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on your point of view), by the time they proposed a third ST movie, Nimoy’s career had stalled, a number of projects he had had in the pipe by the end of ST2 had fizzled, lost funding or just been rejected, and when the producers approached him about appearing in another ST movie, Nimoy agreed. Thus, Spock was reborn…and lo, all was well.

    2) I laughed my ass off at “1.21 GIGAWATTS!!” Fucking brilliant use of the line, loved it! XD

    I’ve been more of a fan of your game reviews and just recently started checking out your movie and board game reviews, and I’ve gotta say I’m really enjoying them! Please keep them up, it’s good stuff. Live long…and prosper. :)

  • January 22, 2011 at 4:51 pm

    The one thing I find strange in this movie is how unrealistic Kirk’s relationship with his son. Kirk was of course shocked and crushed when he first heard of David’s death but after that, he didn’t show any sign of sadness at the end. I was expecting Kirk to burst into tears or something but nope, he seemed to be more concern about reviving Spock than the death of his own son. That I find really stupid.

  • keepshowkeeper

    October 26, 2011 at 1:39 pm

    Reason why I always liked ST is that watching it at home on TV always felt a bit like being at the movie theater, with all the FX and space scenes. That’s why I categorize the movies into either A) “an average episode blown up to be a movie” or B) “a REAL cinematic movie that goes far beyond the plot of an episode”.
    The first ST-movie is clearly category A – a plot that would be even too short for a 40-minute-episode. Khan is B – it’s just epic, the story could not have been told in an episode. Search For Spock is definitely A. Adding the unplausibilities pointed out in your review plus the horrible translation-mistakes in the german version (I grew up with) made it nearly C – a bad movie. ST IV is BB – a fest for every ST-fan who likes a good laugh. BTW ST5 B, ST6 B, ST7 A, ST8 BB, ST9 A, ST10 A, ST11 B.

  • DavidARice

    January 23, 2013 at 1:13 pm

    “I was frozen today.”

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